40th MP Battalion welcomes new commander

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Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, right, passes the colors to Col. Michael Johnston, 15th MP Brigade commander, during his change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp

Katie Peterson | Staff Writer


Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann relinquished command of the 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) to Lt. Col. John Magliocca before retiring after 28 years of active-duty service in a ceremony July 1 in Eisenhower Hall’s DePuy Auditorium.

Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, accepts the colors from Col. Michael Johnston, 15th MP Brigade commander, during his change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


Hofmann assumed command of the 40th MP Battalion on July 11, 2019.


“This is truly a momentous day and occasion as we recognize the hard work and tireless, selfless service of Lieutenant Colonel Matt Hofmann as demonstrated not only over the last two years as the commander of the Justice Battalion, but over his … years of service to our Army, the Military Police Corps and more importantly our soldiers and families,” said Col. Michael Johnston, 15th MP Brigade commander. “He’s a critical thinker, very methodical. He’s slow to anger and rarely gets excited. He is true to his word. He loves his family and knows when to place them first because, as we know, the Army won’t do that for you very often.


“Matt understands that to be a good leader, you must be a good follower first. He loves soldiers and soldiering. As evidence, before he ever became a commissioned officer, he was a soldier first,” he said. “Finally, he is as selfless a leader as you’ll ever meet.”


During Hofmann’s command, there were no serious security incidents at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks nor were there any cases of COVID-19 within the facility. Additionally, his team received a 100 percent scoring during their American Corrections Association reaccreditation.

Brig. Gen. Duane Miller, Army Corrections Command commanding general, presents the Legion of Merit to Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, during his retirement ceremony, following Hofmann’s change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


“This is a testament to Matt and his team’s tenacious, disciplined approach to ensure the safety and security of the soldiers and our mission,” Johnston said. “The mission Matt and his soldiers performed is often a very thankless one. It doesn’t garner the same attention, respect or accolades as other organizations.

“Matt’s humility and ability to be a team player is what enabled the Justice Battalion to be successful,” he said. “Matt, the Griffin team, leaders and family here today couldn’t be prouder of you for the sacrifices you and your family have made over your amazing career. You’ve made a marked difference with everything you touched and improved your fighting position with every job in the Army that they threw at you.”


Brig. Gen. Duane Miller, U.S. Army Corrections Command commanding general, oversaw the retirement ceremony and said it’s never an easy decision to retire from active-duty service.


“I know that over your career it was about instilling discipline, it was about training, leading, caring for and serving soldiers and families,” Miller said. “You did it embodying the Army values — loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage. Every day you lived that.”


Hofmann was presented the Legion of Merit recognizing his 28 years of service, a certificate of retirement, a U.S. flag and an ACC coin. His wife, Lt. Col. Corrie Hanson, commander of the 705th MP Battalion (Detention), received a certificate of appreciation.

Brig. Gen. Duane Miller, Army Corrections Command commanding general, presents an ACC coin to Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, during his retirement ceremony, following Hofmann’s change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp

“Assuming command of a battalion was always my goal and these last few years have been the absolute highlight of my career,” Hofmann said. “To the soldiers, NCOs and officers of the Justice Battalion, it has been and always will be my honor to say that I was your commander.


“Despite a manning shortage and COVID and everything that that brought about, you always performed with distinction. While other units shut down and quarantined in place, we didn’t have that option,” he said. “You can’t use Microsoft Teams to prepare meals for the inmates. You can’t FaceTime the delivery of medicine. The mission remained unchanged: providing for the security and operations of the (Department of Defense’s) only maximum-security prison. The men and women of the Justice Battalion accomplished that mission honorably and admirably. Words cannot express how awed I am at what you do or what you accomplish every day regardless of the circumstances.

Brig. Gen. Duane Miller, Army Corrections Command commanding general; Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander; Lt. Col. Corrie Hanson, 705th MP Battalion (Detention) commander and Hofmann’s spouse; and Hofmann and Hanson’s son, Lucas, watch the couple’s daughter, Adria, amuse herself with paper and pens during Hofmann’s retirement ceremony July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Hofmann’s retirement ceremony followed his change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp

“(To) those I have had the pleasure to lead, I need you to know that I’ve learned just as much from you as I hope you learned from me.”


Magliocca commissioned into the Army in 2003 from the Northeastern University ROTC program in Boston.


He has served in a variety of law enforcement and leadership positions at Fort Carson, Colo.; Camp Casey, Korea; Yongsan, Korea; Fort Drum, N.Y.; Fort Jackson, S.C.; and Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. His most recent assignment was as provost marshal of the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum.


Johnston said he had four pieces of advice for Magliocca, starting with, “listen first.”


“I know you’re new to corrections. It was something that I had to do being new to corrections myself. Your first 60 to 90 days, you’ve all got an all-star cast of leaders and civilians who absolutely won’t let you down, but you’ve got to humble yourself enough to listen first to your teammates,” Johnston said. “Second, lead your soldiers in the way that you would want to be led daily. Do that much and you can’t go wrong.


“Love your team and hold them accountable to our standards because we got a lot. … That accountability piece is critical,” he said. “And four … don’t put your head on your pillow at night unless you can say you have done all you can to ensure the readiness and the well-being of your soldiers. … I know you’re up to the challenge.”

Lt. Col. John Magliocca, incoming 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, delivers remarks during his change of command ceremony with Lt. Col. Matthew Hofmann, outgoing 40th Military Police Battalion (Detention) commander, July 1 in DePuy Auditorium. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


Magliocca said he is honored to be the battalion commander.


“It is an honor to command the Justice Battalion and privilege to serve amongst these fine professionals,” Magliocca said.


For the full ceremony, visit the 15th Military Police Brigade Facebook page.

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