Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Antwone Jones holds the colors as Vincent Grewatz, director of Installation Management Command-Training, attaches the safety streamer Oct. 19 in the Garrison commander's office. Fort Leavenworth Garrison received the U.S. Army Excellence Streamer Award in recognition of safety excellence while meeting training requirements and incident rate standards. U.S. Army photo by Stephanie Mahone

Charlotte Richter | Staff Writer

The U.S. Army Garrison Command Team of Fort Leavenworth received the U.S. Army Excellence Streamer Award in recognition of safety excellence while meeting training requirements and incident rate standards during a small ceremony Oct. 19 in the Garrison commander’s office.


According to U.S. Army Installation Management Command, garrisons must complete 12 consecutive months without experiencing a unit at fault Class A or B accident, completion of the Army Readiness Assessment Program and attain 100 percent completion of Risk Management Training to earn the award.


In Army regulations for accident reporting and investigation, the Army defines an accident as “an unplanned event or series of events” resulting in injury or illness to soldiers or civilians, and/or property damage caused by the Army and its operations. A Class A incident is an Army accident with a total cost of property damage equal to or exceeding $2 million or injuries/occupational illness that results in a fatality or per-manent total disability. Class B incidents are Army accidents with total property damage of $500,000 or more or injuries/ occupational illness that result in permanent partial disability; Class B accidents could also result in the inpatient hospitalization of three
or more personnel from a single incident.

Garrison Commander Col. John Misenheimer Jr. shakes hands with Vincent Grewatz, director of Installation Management Command-Training, during an awards ceremony Oct. 19 in the Garrison commander’s office. Fort Leavenworth Garrison received the U.S. Army Excellence Streamer Award in recognition of safety excellence while meeting training requirements and incident rate standards. U.S. Army photo by Stephanie Mahone


Vincent Grewatz, director of IMCOM-Training, said commitment from leadership played an important role in creating an effective safety culture on Fort Leavenworth. He praised the installation for well-rounded safety and risk management programs.


“It really is about having leader engagement at every level to address anything that looks like it’s not working properly, so it’s an awareness issue, but it’s also a command
emphasis,” Grewatz said. He said the award is difficult to earn, especially during COVID-19 conditions, and while any garrison could earn the award, accidents are a frequent disqualifier during the assessment of criteria.


“I think this is a huge accomplishment because it is so rare that organizations get the
safety recognition,” Grewatz said. “Safety is common in the Army — safety is our top
priority, everyone says that.

That’s kind of a platitude: safety is job one, but actually putting that into practice… it’s
deeds, not words, that matter.

“The safety streamer is an important recognition that the deeds matter here in addition to the words that were put out.”


The streamer will be displayed until the command team is assessed again in a
year.

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