Guests go through a receiving line for honorees retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter and Lois Arter after a ceremony dedicating Arter Atrium in the couple's honor Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Arter Atrium is located inside the front entrance of the Lewis and Clark Center. A portrait of the Arters hangs outside Marshall Lecture Hall. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp

Charlotte Richter | Staff Writer

Arter Atrium was dedicated in honor of retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter and his wife Lois Arter during a ceremony Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center.

Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth Commanding General Lt. Gen.Theodore Martin addresses honorees retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter and Lois Arter during a ceremony to dedicate Arter Atrium in the couple’s honor Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Arter Atrium is located inside the front entrance of the Lewis and Clark Center. A portrait of the Arters hangs near the information desk outside Marshall Lecture Hall. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


A portrait of the Arters, on display in front of Marshall Lecture Hall, was unveiled during the ceremony. The atrium was dedicated in the couple’s honor in recognition of their contributions to the Fort Leavenworth community, U.S. Army and nation.


Arter commissioned into the Army as an infantry officer in 1950, the same year he and Lois married. Arter’s first assignment was with the 25th Infantry Division serving in the
Korean War. Following his return from Korea, he continued into some of the highest Army leadership positions. Arter served as the deputy commandant of the Command and
General Staff College as a brigadier general from 1977-1979.


Following his position at CGSC, Arter assumed command of the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. Arter retired from the Army in 1986, but he remained involved in the military community and served on a variety of local boards. In 2005, he was a founding chairman of the CGSC Foundation, though he had an existing legacy from his previous position and two endowed awards, the Arter-Darby Military History Writing Award for the CGSC student with the best monograph and the Arter-Doniphan Award for the CGSC student with the highest grade-point average. Arter served as the civilian aid to the secretary of the Army from 2006 to emeritus status in 2018.

Training and Doctrine Command Commander Gen. Paul Funk II and former Lt. Gov. Gary Sherrer go through a receiving line to greet retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter and Lois Arter after a ceremony dedicating Arter Atrium in the couple’s honor Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Arter Atrium is located inside the front entrance of the Lewis and Clark Center. A portrait of the Arters hangs outside Marshall Lecture Hall. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


During her husband’s military career, Lois Arter took on her own responsibilities in the military community. She volunteered for the Red Cross, Army Community Service,
Army Emergency Relief and spouses’ clubs. She was a hostess for CAC and CGSC and served as an Arlington Lady in Washington. She received Training and Doctrine Command’s Margaret C. Corbin award for her service in 2012.

Lois Arter and retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter look to each other as some of their contributions are read during a ceremony dedicating Arter Atrium in honor of the couple for their service to the nation, Army and community Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


In 2019, she received the Alpha Gamma Delta Talent of Leadership Award for her achievements in her community. During the dedication, Robert Arter told those in attendance that they should continue to revere the lives of soldiers for their service to the country. He said soldiers share an instinct and an oath, and there is a debt owed
to them that cannot be repaid. In this he said ceremony attendees and other citizens can support such missions as that of CGSC.

Retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter delivers remarks during a ceremony dedicating the Lewis and Clark Center atrium as the Arter Atrium in honor of Arter and his wife, Lois Arter, Nov. 17. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


“The U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, from my judgment — our judgment — is central to the welfare and success of this nation. Ever it has been, commanded and
staffed by extraordinary, strong, visionary men and women,” Arter said. “The college increasingly becomes central to ensuring that our soldiers’ destiny rests in the hands of leaders, commanders, grown by the Leavenworth experience,” Arter said.

Lois Arter and retired Lt. Gen. Robert Arter look to each other as some of their contributions are read during a ceremony dedicating Arter Atrium in honor of the couple for their service to the nation, Army and community Nov. 17 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp


Ceremony host Lt. Gen Theodore Martin, commandant of CGSC and commanding general of the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth, said Arter casts a long shadow in his life.


“It’s the least we can do to honor this Army family,” Martin said. “The thing that excites me about (the dedication) is that the picture will be there, but from now on when we have meetings, when we have events, when we have ceremonies, it will say ‘at the Arter
Atrium.’ It will become part of the history of the officers that flow through this institution.”

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