• Audie Murphy Club welcomes new member

  • Sgt. 1st Class Vincent Jarman, watch commander, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Joint Regional Correctional Facility, 705th Military Police Battalion (Detention), was officially inducted as the newest member of the Lamp Chapter of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club in a ceremony Aug. 23 in DePuy Auditorium.

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  • Katie Peterson | Staff Writer
    Sgt. 1st Class Vincent Jarman, watch commander, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Joint Regional Correctional Facility, 705th Military Police Battalion (Detention), was officially inducted as the newest member of the Lamp Chapter of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club in a ceremony Aug. 23 in DePuy Auditorium.
    Audie Murphy is the most decorated soldier in American history, earning every medal of valor given by the United States, as well as one Belgian medal and three French medals. He was discharged from the Army on Sept. 21, 1945, and moved to Hollywood where he became a well-known author, actor, producer, songwriter and poet. He was killed in a plane crash on May 28, 1971, at the age of 46.
    SAMC President Sgt. 1st Class William Speer said Jarman is a noncommissioned officer committed to the welfare of his soldiers and the nation like Audie Murphy.
    “He is truly a selfless NCO,” Speer said.
    Jarman has volunteered with SAMC for the Adopt-a-Highway clean up, numerous color guards, the Veterans Affairs trail clean-up and maintenance, and the Meals on Wheels program. He said volunteering with Meals on Wheels is his favorite.
    “Actually getting out there, talking to some of the population we work with (who are) is not really able to get out and take care of themselves in the ways they used to be able to and talk to them, find out their stories, learn a little bit about their lives and provide them with that service is a great thing,” Jarman said. “I love participating in it.”
    As part of his induction, Jarman was presented with a certificate of achievement, a framed biography of Audie Murphy, a membership card certifying him as a lifelong member, and the SAMC medallion featuring the club crest, designed by original SAMC organizer and professional illustrator Don Moore.
    Mission Command Center of Excellence Sgt. Maj. Christopher Prosser, who served as the guest speaker, said the awards presented to new SAMC members are just byproducts of the things NCOs do every day. He said it is about the way NCOs emulate the actions and values of Audie Murphy.
    “It is the things that you don’t read about that really make Audie Murphy who he was,” Prosser said. “He joined the Army during war, knowing he was going to war. During his two years and four months in combat, he went from being a rifleman to a company commander. He was an enlisted soldier to a commissioned officer.
    “During an engagement on the border of Germany and France, Sergeant Murphy, who was shot in the leg by enemy fire, mounted a disabled tank destroyer and employed a machine gun to repel the attack of an entire Germany company for over an hour. He was wounded again during the defense and only when he ran out of ammunition did he fall back to ensure that his wounded soldiers were treated and evacuated,” he said. “When he was asked at his Medal of Honor ceremony what makes someone do something like that, he simply said ‘they were killing my friends, and I had something that I had to do.’ That’s the legacy of Sergeant Audie Murphy that lives on in our noncommissioned officers.”
    Page 2 of 2 - Prosser said being an NCO is a calling, not a job.
    “The words of the medallion are three and they say, ‘outstanding noncommissioned officer.’ That’s powerful,” Prosser said. “We’re entrusted with the lives of America’s sons and daughters and that is a responsibility we should not take lightly. Our soldiers’ survival rests in our competence, character, candor and commitment. That’s what this award is about.
    “Like Sergeant Murphy, Sergeant Jarman’s story doesn’t begin today. His journey began in 2006 … and it wasn’t the big things that he did that led him to sit here today,” he said.
    “It was the inner drive that noncommissioned officers like Sergeant Jarman have every day. It is getting up early. It is checking the barracks. It is conducting physical training. It is counseling soldiers on potential, mentoring commissioned officers to be future higher-level leaders. It is training to standard regardless of the situation, regardless of the conditions and being a role model for all noncommissioned officers. It is the day-to-day operations great noncommissioned officers do to set an example just like Sergeant Murphy did 75 years ago.”
    Prosser said when he spoke with Jarman during the interview process for potential induction, Jarman said his favorite part of being an NCO was watching his soldiers develop.
    “He didn’t say it was standing in front of formation barking orders. He didn’t say it was the pay. He watches his soldiers develop,” Prosser said. “That’s very authentic because it is about the noncommissioned officers that came before him that showed him what great looks like.
    “I challenge each leader in this room today, be it commissioned or noncommissioned officers, to be the leader you want to be led by,” he said. “Be an inspiration to others. There is only one way to do that. Lead like Sergeant Murphy did — from the front and unwavering in your standards.”
    Jarman said being officially inducted as a SAMC member was a goal he’s had for himself for several years.
    “I remember seeing a lot of NCOs who would be the person soldiers would go to to get the help that they need, that always had the answer. I remember seeing that (as a private) and wanting to be that,” Jarman said. “I think that the club has done a lot of things not only to improve knowledge base and professionalism, but to also increase media relations with post and with the surrounding community.
    “Overall, the members of the club have shown to be professionals and have shown to be excellent NCOs, excellent at what they do, and I just wanted to be like them the entire time,” he said. “Now, I’m just hoping that this is a stepping stone on the way to continue to improve upon what I know and what I can do and just keep going.”
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