• CGSC presents awards for writing

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  • Army University Public Affairs
    Brig. Gen. Scott Efflandt, Army University provost and deputy commandant of the Command and General Staff College, recognized 29 faculty members with 33 writing awards acknowledging their professionalism and scholarship during the Gold Pen awards ceremony Sept. 13 in the Lewis and Clark Center’s Eisenhower Auditorium. The ceremony also recognized Army University communicators for their achievements in the annual Training and Doctrine Command Communications Awards Program and awarded a commander’s coin for outstanding customer service.
    Efflandt acknowledged that publishing and the scholarship, research, and collaboration it requires is important and reflects on the prestige of the college. However, scholarship is not the primary importance.
    “That is a measure of performance against effectiveness,” Efflandt said, “and the effectiveness is what we do here. We think critically about the future of warfare, we put chips in the bank through our students and through our exercises. So, when it’s time to cash that check in a moment of need like happened on Sept. 11, 2001, that capacity is there.”
    Dr. David W. Mills, of the Department of Military History, received the top award for his book “Operation Snowbound: Life behind the Blizzard of 1949,” North Dakota State University Press, 2018.
    “Writing and publishing is a rewarding experience, and gives you a great sense of accomplishment,” Mills said. “For anyone who is thinking of taking on a book project, I would tell them to go for it! A word of caution though: only take on publishing projects that you are passionate about, otherwise it will stop being fun. I would also suggest that folks generally stick with what they know the first time out. If your interest is World War II, but you are thinking of writing a book about Napoleon, that might be a stretch. There is so much background information to catch up on.”
    Mills said the relationship between publishing and teaching is strong.
    “Writing keeps me focused on history as a discipline and keeps me energized about my profession. Not everyone likes to write, but I think it makes me a better teacher by constantly making me ask questions about what happened and why,” Mills said. “I can also find threads in what I’m researching and what I’m teaching. It is always fun to throw out a fact that I’m sure nobody has heard before.”
    Mills was the sole author of his book but many professors write in groups of two or more.
    Dr. Thomas G. Bradbeer and Scott Porter, both from the Department of Command and Leadership, co-authored the article “Enhancing Learning Using Multimedia in Professional Military Education,” published in the Journal of Military Learning last October. The article focuses on a popular Command and General Staff Officer Course elective, Organizational Leadership Case Studies, Bradbeer created. As the elective became more popular, Porter signed on as one of the additional instructors. Students encouraged the instructors to write about the course.
    Page 2 of 4 - “It is more challenging to write as co-authors but also more rewarding,” Porter said. “Co-authors have the opportunity to bounce ideas off each other and analyze the subject from different perspectives. During the research and writing process, dialogue between the co-authors must be critical and candid while examining every aspect of the paper. The draft paper is shared with colleagues for their critical feedback. The result is an article that provides the reader an interesting and logical essay that possesses high intellectual standards.”
    Bradbeer said he prefers to write as a single author so that he has complete control of the project.
    “What I have learned from co-authoring this article is that it is critical to find a co-author that is passionate about the topic and willing to put in the hard work (research, discussions and repeated drafts) to see the project through to publication,” Bradbeer said. “I think it is easier to write an article alone, but by having a co-author you may learn more from the process and become a better learner for it.”
    Porter said writing and teaching go together.
    “Writing and teaching have the same purpose: to educate, to add to the professional body of knowledge, and to further develop critical thinking in others and ourselves,” he said.
    The Golden Pen Awards recognize faculty members for professional writing. The program is run by volunteers from the CGSC faculty who staff three committees that recognize authors in three categories. The Gold Pen is awarded for books or book length works. Silver is awarded for a chapter of a book, a journal article or a stand-alone monograph that is not part of a degree program. The Bronze Pen is given for a short article, undocumented article, encyclopedia article, book review, op-ed piece or letter to the editor, or a body of work consisting of no more than five publications.
    Gold Pen Award
    Dr. David W. Mills, Department of Military History, “Operation Snowbound: Life behind the Blizzard of 1949,” North Dakota State University Press, 2018. It is his first Gold Pen Award.
    Silver Pen Awards
    Dr. David A. Anderson, Department of Joint, Interagency and Multinational Operations, “State Power and the Economic Curse of Globalization,” a chapter in “Through the Joint, Interagency, and Multinational Lens, Vol. III,” to be published by Army University Press, Summer 2018. (24th award).
    Rick Baillergeon, Department of Tactics, “Transitions: Adapting to Change in Division Large Scale Combat Operations,” a chapter in “Large Scale Combat Operations: The Division Fight, Volume I,” to be published by Army University Press, Summer 2018. (fourth award).
    Dr. Richard E. Berkebile, DJIMO, “Military Strategy Revisited: A Critique of the Lykke Formulation,” Military Review (online), May 2018. (fifth award).
    Page 3 of 4 - Dr. Thomas G. Bradbeer and Scott A. Porter, Department of Command and Leadership , “Enhancing Learning Using Multimedia in Professional Military Education,” Journal of Military Learning, October 2017. (seventh award) (fifth award).
    Dr. Anthony E. Carlson, School of Advanced Military Studies, “There May Be Bloodshed: The US Reclamation Service, Localism, and Water Conflicts in the Montana-Alberta Borderlands, 1900-1910,” a chapter in “Farming Across Boundaries: A Transnational History of the North American West,” Texas A&M University Press, October 2017. (fourth award)
    David G. Cotter, DMH, “Moral Injury Among Perpetrators of Genocide,” Army University (online), April 2018.
    Dale C. Eikmeier, DJIMO, “Joint Warfighting: Lessons from the South Atlantic War,” to be published in Vision Conjunta (Journal of the Joint War College of Argentina), 2018. (11th award)
    Dr. Prisco R. Hernández, Command and General Staff School, “Courting Cuba: America’s Girl-Next Door; Eurasia’s Distant Beauty,” a chapter in “Cultural Perspectives, Geopolitics & Energy Security of Eurasia: Is the Next Global Conflict Imminent?,” Army University Press, Fall 2017. (14th award)
    Lee O. Lacy, Department of Distance Education, “Executive Decision: The Clemency Requests of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg,” to be published by the American Intelligence Journal, 2018. (fifth award)
    John M. Lorenzen and Lt. Col. Matthew N. Metzel, DDE, “Military Force and Mass Migration in Europe,” Parameters, Autumn 2017.
    Lt. Col. Trent J. Lythgoe, DTAC, “Controlling Chaos,” a chapter in “Large Scale Combat Operations: The Division Fight, Volume I,” to be published by Army University Press, Summer 2018. (second award)
    Kailah M. Murry, DDE, “Five Years Later: Women, Combat Operations and “Revisiting the Other Fifty Percent,” published online in the American Intelligence Journal, 2018. (second award)
    Dr. Richard A. Olsen, DCL, “Servant Leadership in the Classroom: Serving Adult Students While Maintaining High Academic Standards,” Journal of Military Learning, April 2018. (second award)
    Dr. David S. Pierson, DDE, “Reengineering Army Education for Adult Learners,” Journal of Military Learning, October 2017. (fourth award)
    Gregory M. Thomas, DTAC, “Mission Command and the Division Fight,” a chapter in “Large Scale Combat Operations: The Division Fight, Volume I,” to be published by Army University Press, Summer 2018.
    Patrick J. Wesner, CGSS, “Finding the Fix for American Reconstruction and Stabilization Efforts Abroad,” a chapter in “Through the Joint, Interagency, and Multinational Lens, Vol. III,” Army University Press, Summer 2018.
    Bronze Pen Awards
    Dr. David A. Anderson, DJIMO, for his body of work featuring two book reviews in The Interagency Journal and Strategic Studies Quarterly. (21st award)
    Rick Baillergeon, DTAC, for a body of work consisting of five book reviews in Infantry Magazine and Military Review. (19th award)
    Page 4 of 4 - Dr. Richard E. Berkebile, DJIMO, for his body of work featuring three book reviews in Military Review. (sixth award)
    Dr. Steven A. Boylan, DCL, for his article on the Air Force’s freeze on engaging the media in Task and Purpose. (third award)
    Robert M. Brown, DJIMO, for his body of work featuring two book reviews in Military Review. (fifth award)
    Dale C. Eikmeier, DJIMO, for his featured book review in Parameters. (fourth award)
    David D. Haught, DTAC - Fort Belvoir, for his body of work featuring two book reviews in Military Review. (fifth award)
    John V. Kloeker, Army Management Staff College, for his body of work featuring three book reviews in Military Review.
    Roger J. Linder, Department of Logistics and Resource Operations, for his body of work featuring two book reviews in the Military Review.
    Dr. Richard A. McConnell, DTAC, for his body of work featuring three book reviews in Finest Hour and Marine Corps History. (eighth award)
    Jesse McIntyre III, DDE, for his body of work featuring five book reviews in Military Review. (fifth award)
    Robert J. Rielly, DCL, for his body of work featuring three book reviews in Military Review. (11th award)
    Kevin G. Rousseau, Command and General Staff College National Intelligence Studies Chair, for his body of work featuring four book reviews in Military Review and the Interagency Journal.
    Ronald T. Staver, DDE, for his body of work featuring two book reviews in Military Review. (third award)
    Arin Burgess and Staff Sgt. Alan Brutus of Army University Press received Training and Doctrine Command Certificates of Achievement for their 2017 TRADOC Major General Keith L. Ware communication awards results. Burgess took first place in the Print Category A, Printed Publication and Honorable Mention in the Graphics Category B, Identity Design. Brutus received honorable mention in Broadcast Category C, Short Form Video Production, and Print Category D, Outstanding Digital Media Management.
    Cynthia Palmer, Army University Human Resources Division, received a commander’s coin for her outstanding customer service during a two-week period when the division was severely understaffed.
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