• Single Soldier Quarters wings named for soldiers

  • Since 1964, all new housing areas have been named for Native American nations. They honor the indigenous people of the Great Plains.

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  • Quentin Schillare | Special to the Fort Leavenworth Lamp
    Groups are well represented as namesakes on Fort Leavenworth.
    Since 1964, all new housing areas have been named for Native American nations. They honor the indigenous people of the Great Plains.
    Long-serving infantry, artillery and cavalry regiments serve as namesakes for streets in the housing areas on the southwest part of post. The Buffalo Soldier Monument represents the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments and their contributions to the Army starting with their organization in the 19th century. The 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion memorial in the Circle of Firsts Park — although represented by the bust of 1st Sgt. Walter Morris — memorializes the entire ground-breaking airborne battalion.
    Constitution Grove near the Lewis and Clark Center honors the 23 signers of the Constitution with military service during the Revolutionary War.
    Unique among the groups memorialized is the Single Soldier Quarters. The namesake soldiers in this group share no direct connection other than all served in the U.S. Army.
    The Single Soldier Quarters was constructed in 2003 to permit the consolidation of single soldiers from several older barracks on Main Post into modern living accommodations near the new commercial and recreation center of the post along Cody Road, Kansas Avenue and Grant Avenue. It is within walking distance of the Harney Sports Complex, the Commissary and Hiram Rich Plaza (the Post Exchange area).
    The Single Soldier Quarters is a three-story structure built with a central core with five adjacent wings providing the rooms for soldiers. This complex reflects Army billeting philosophy that in garrison a soldier is entitled to the privacy of her or his own room. In late 2009 to mid-2010, the Single Soldier Quarters was enlarged with another barracks, a dining facility and a battalion support area. Reflecting the desire to honor the diversity of the current force, those memorialized are a cross section of the Army. They reflect Army service spanning from the frontier in the 19th century to events in Afghanistan in 2010.
    First Lt. William McBryar (1861-1941) enlisted in the Army in 1887 and served as a sergeant and first sergeant in Company K, 10th Cavalry. McBryar was one of only 18 African-Americans to be awarded the Medal of Honor during the Indian Wars. He served in Cuba as a quartermaster sergeant with Company H, 25th Infantry. For his bravery in Cuba, McBryar was commissioned a second lieutenant and served in Company M, 8th U.S. Volunteer Infantry, and later as first lieutenant commanded Company K, 49th U.S. Volunteer Infantry Regiment, in the Philippines. When mustered out of volunteer service he returned to civilian life. He briefly returned to the Army as a private in the 9th Cavalry — including service at Fort Leavenworth — from 1904-05, but his age and previous injuries made Army life difficult. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
    Page 2 of 3 - Chaplain (Col.) Louis A. Carter (1876-1941) was a doctor of divinity who entered the Army as a Baptist chaplain and served mostly on frontier duty in the southwest, including duty as post schoolmaster and librarian at Fort Huachuca, Ariz. He served 30 years in the Army with four black regiments (the 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, and the 24th and 25th Infantry regiments). As a major, Carter was on the faculty of the Army Chaplains School at Fort Leavenworth in 1924. He was the first African-American chaplain to attain the rank of colonel in the Army in 1936 and retired as a colonel in 1940. He is buried at the Fort Huachuca post cemetery.
    Pfc. Vernon H. Janzen (1922-1946) was drafted into the Army in 1942. He served as a medic in North Africa, Sicily, Omaha Beach and Central Europe with the 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. He was awarded the Silver Star for actions in September 1944 when he evacuated casualties under fire in Germany. Janzen was the only private invited to fly back to the United States along with 52 officers with General Dwight D. Eisenhower in the spring of 1945. He participated in the parades and fanfare associated with Eisenhower’s formal return from overseas. He dined at the White House at the invitation of President Harry Truman. He processed out of the Army at Fort Leavenworth. He was killed in an aircraft training accident in April 1946. Janzen is buried in the family plot in the Baptist Cemetery, Lorraine, Kan.
    Capt. Chester L. “Chet” Lee (1939-1966) was commissioned in the regular Army as a military police officer. Lee’s initial assignment was with the 1st Guard Company at the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth from 1961 to 1965. He also served in the 205th Military Police Company as an assistant provost marshal. In late 1965, then-1st Lt. Lee was assigned as the commander of Company C, 716th MP Battalion, 89th MP Group, in Gia Dinh, Republic of Vietnam. He and his driver, Spc. 4th Class Michael T. Mulvaney, were killed as they responded to an enemy attack in Saigon on April 1, 1966. Awarded the Silver Star, Lee was posthumously promoted to captain. Lee was the first officer in the 89th MP Group killed in action in Vietnam. He is buried in Poyen Cemetery, Grant County, Arkansas.
    Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory (1958-2001) enlisted in the Army soon after graduation from Manual High School in Kansas City, Mo., in 1977 and served in the continental United States, Germany and deployed to Southwest Asia during the Persian Gulf War. He was the senior enlisted adviser to the assistant secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs when he was killed in the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. Holder of bachelor and master degrees, he served 24 years in the Army and was awarded the Purple Heart and the Legion of Merit. Ivory is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
    Page 3 of 3 - Sgt. 1st Class Charles M. “CJ” Sadell (1976-2010) enlisted in the Army following his graduation from high school in 1995 and served as an infantryman and intelligence analyst with deployments in the Continental United States, including a tour with the Battle Command Training Program at Fort Leavenworth, as well as tours in Germany, Saudi Arabia, Kosovo, Iraq and Afghanistan. On Oct. 5, 2010, Sadell was wounded in action in Arif Kala, Afghanistan, while serving with the 1st Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division. He died of his wounds on Oct. 24, 2010, in Bethesda, Md. He was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star Medal. His memorial service was in Weston, Mo.
    The newest wing of the Single Soldier Quarters was named in Sadell’s honor in a ceremony May 11, 2012.
    For information on his book: Fort Leavenworth: The People Behind the Names, visit here.
    For the 1st installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 2nd installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 3rd installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 4th installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 5th installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 6th installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 7th installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
    For the 8th installment of the People Behind Post Places series visit here.
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