• Seminars show off newest mission technology

  • The Mission Command Battle Lab and the Command and General Staff College hosted the fifth in a series of brown bag lunch technology seminars. The seminar featured technical demonstrations of Nett Warrior by personnel from Product Manager Ground Soldier; Unmanned Systems Command and Control for Operations in Urban Terrain; Advanced Language Translation from Communications-Electronics, Research, Development and Engineering Center; and the Zones of Protection from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

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  • The Mission Command Battle Lab and the Command and General Staff College hosted the fifth in a series of brown bag lunch technology seminars. The seminar featured technical demonstrations of Nett Warrior by personnel from Product Manager Ground Soldier; Unmanned Systems Command and Control for Operations in Urban Terrain; Advanced Language Translation from Communications-Electronics, Research, Development and Engineering Center; and the Zones of Protection from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
    The two-day agenda included opportunities for hands-on, one-on-one demonstrations. Small groups of approximately 16-20 students got an up-close view of the NW system currently being fielded in the 10th Mountain Division. Housed on a smart phone, these software applications are designed to bring situational awareness and digital information to the squad and platoon level, and big data analytic tools that will be included in upcoming versions of the Distributed Common Ground System – Army program.
    One CGSC student said, "It's great to know exactly where your soldiers are located to give you situational awareness to make better decisions and all on a smart phone."
    The MCBL makes every effort to synchronize the products demonstrated with the CGSC course of instruction, such as hand-held technologies demonstrated during brigade operations. Additionally, an even broader spectrum of operational feedback is received from the many multinational and sister-service personnel attending CGSC. Conversely, the students who participate in the seminars expand their experience base and are better prepared when the new technologies arrive in the field.
    The Science and Technology Branch of the MCBL conducts mission command technology seminars, twice a year at the Lewis and Clark Center as part of the CGSC Mission Command week. Thanks to support from the college, more than 600 students took part in seven different technology demonstrations and four information briefs during the two-day event.
    "Coordinating and synchronizing this event with the CGSC Mission Command week makes complete sense," said Colonel Michael T. Tetu, the MCBL director. "With great cooperation between the many organizations involved, we were able to facilitate tremendous dialogue between the Army's great young leaders and the brilliant engineers developing tomorrow's Mission Command systems. Both communities will move forward better informed and the Army better off."
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