• CAL?survey reveals trends, attitudes in Army leadership

  • An Army organization responsible for tracking and improving leadership and leadership development released survey results on how Army managers are doing. The results average 3 out of four positive responses, but show areas the Army can improve.

    The Center for Army Leadership, which released its 2010 Annual Survey of Army Leadership, is the authoritative source for how Army leaders assess the state of Army leadership and leader development. Conducted since 2005, this survey assesses Army leader attitudes and tracks trends in leader development, the quality of leadership, and the contribution of leadership to mission accomplishment. The results provide valuable information for senior Army leaders to make decisions and develop policy and programming.


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  • An Army organization responsible for tracking and improving leadership and leadership development released survey results on how Army managers are doing. The results average 3 out of four positive responses, but show areas the Army can improve.
    The Center for Army Leadership, which released its 2010 Annual Survey of Army Leadership, is the authoritative source for how Army leaders assess the state of Army leadership and leader development.
    Conducted since 2005, this survey assesses Army leader attitudes and tracks trends in leader development, the quality of leadership, and the contribution of leadership to mission accomplishment. The results provide valuable information for senior Army leaders to make decisions and develop policy and programming.
    More than 22,000 uniformed leaders in the active and reserve components, along with more than 4,500 Department of the Army civilian leaders, participated in the 2010 survey.
    Each year, survey development starts with identifying issues the Army feels are important to leadership and leader development. To adequately track trends and identify patterns, many survey items are repeated in each year’s survey.
    Other items have been dropped, added or modified in order to balance survey size and respondent fatigue/time required, with the need to cover a wide range of topical leadership issues. This is done in part to ensure that the survey assesses issues in the Army that change from year to year. Data is collected through both quantitative (e.g., select a response) and qualitative (e.g., type a brief answer) means. More than 100 items cover topics on the quality of leadership and leader development.
    Survey results show:
    • Army leaders perceive their immediate superiors, particularly those who effectively deal with uncertainty (71 percent) and demonstrate resiliency (76 percent), as effective at getting results and accomplishing the mission.
    • 60 percent of leaders think their unit outperforms similar units; and most (80 percent) believe their knowledge, skills and abilities are suited for the challenges of their work.
    • 97 percent of those surveyed said they have observed a positive, constructive leader this past year.
    • About one in five Army leaders report their immediate superior demonstrates toxic leadership behavior. Four out of five Army leaders report observing a leader who demonstrated toxic leadership behavior in the past year.
    • 24 percent of Army leaders believe honest mistakes are held against them in their unit/organization.
    Military officials recognized that, while the results are mostly positive, there are areas in which the Army needs improvement. Annual studies, such as the CASAL, provide the Army with new insights on leadership and leader development issues, and the current working environment of the Army.  
    “The Army will use the results of this report and other tools, to include the Commander’s Assessment Tool, as part of its continuing commitment to provide Soldiers with high-quality officer leadership,” said Army Chief of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey.
    Page 2 of 2 - The Center for Army Leadership oversees leadership and leader-development including research, analysis, assessment and evaluation, for the Combined Arms Center. CAL administers leadership doctrine; coordination, development and management of initiatives within the Army Leader Development Program; and the integration and synchronization of Professional Military Education and Civilian Education system. For more information on CAL or CASAL visit the CAL website at http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/ CAL.
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